Why I Shoot Digital Too

The first camera I bought was a Canon AE-1 Program. I chose it because I was always fascinated by the AE-1 my dad had, and the black and white photos it captured that hung in our house. Photography was always a thing that interested me, but was never something I thought about delving into until I was in my late 20s.

When I received my AE-1P, I put a few rolls of film through it and immediately fell in love. The look of the photos, the feel of the camera in my hands, the satifying CLACK it makes when I press the shutter! The whole process of taking photos with a film camera is so sensorially fulfilling and addicting to me! I can be having a terrible day, but after I fire off a couple of frames on that clunky Canon, I instantly feel better.

So why, if I love film so much, did I buy a digital camera a few months later? Short answer? I didn’t want to travel with film. My girlfriend and I had planned a 10 day trip to Europe in April of this year, and we were planning on travelling light. I had no experience travelling with film before and all of the articles and how-tos I read on the subject didn’t make it seem all that appealing. I debated about what I wanted to do photographically on this trip and decided digital was the way to go. I started looking at what I wanted in a digital camera and ended up choosing the Sony a6000. It had all of the features I wanted (electronic viewfinder, interchangeable lenses, articulating screen, compact size, 24.5 MP sensor) and nothing I didn’t need (4k video, full frame, hefty price tag, etc). In my opinion, it’s the perfect digital camera for me at the moment.

Another unintended benefit of buying a digital camera is how much I’ve learned about photography while using it. I use my Canon FD lenses on it with an adapter (the kit lens is pretty bad for photography), and the muscle memory training of manually focusing and adjust the aperture, while seeing immediate results in the viewfinder is awesome! Seeing each variable and its effect on the photo in real time has helped me to understand exposure a lot better. Shooting digital has also freed me up to be more creative and adventurous with my photography, which has made me a lot more confident when I shoot film. I can experiment on digital as proof of concept, then if I like what I see, I’ll shoot a few frames on film. In-camera black and white JPEG treatment also helps me understand what to look for when shooting black and white film. The black and white JPEG helps me to see the contrast and geometry of a scene better than I can see the same scene in color.

This isn’t post isn’t “digital vs. analog” or anything like that. I love shooting photos on both formats and I derive different things from both formats. I like digital for the immediacy of results and because it shortens my learning curve in certain areas of photography. I like film because of the look and feel of the product as well as the sensation shooting brings me.

What the digital vs. analog debate boils down to is a debate over formats, which is silly. Cameras are tools to accomplish a task. I’m not going to take an 8×10 camera to shoot candid photos at a friend’s birthday party, the same way I’m not going to shoot photos I intend to blow up to large prints on a smaller format like 35 or 110. Digital has taught me much about photography, and film reminds me of the importance of slowing down and enjoying the moment.

In short, digital helps me learn and film helps me grow, so there will always room for both formats in my camera bag!

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